Susie Biehl, Emmanuel Auzias, Jude Barton, Susan Hazaleus, Jen Herling, Austin Howlett & Jim Riggins November 16 - December 3rd

Opening reception is Friday, November 17th from 6-8 PM. 

Susie Biehl’s “Discards: Man and Nature” is an exploration of the accumulation and remains of man-made objects and plant based discards. Her fascination with the footprint of both man and nature provides the inspiration for this eclectic collection of rejected material which are then artfully and sometimes whimsically displayed in collage and assemblage

Susie Biehl’s “Discards: Man and Nature” is an exploration of the accumulation and remains of man-made objects and plant based discards. Her fascination with the footprint of both man and nature provides the inspiration for this eclectic collection of rejected material which are then artfully and sometimes whimsically displayed in collage and assemblage

Emmanuel Auzias “Abstract Postcards from the Seashore” are images inspired by the seashore of the South of France. Her paintings invite the viewer to share a place and a moment in time from her life and her memory with the desire to evoke a response and summon the viewer to engage in a conversation with her art and with herself as the sender.

Emmanuel Auzias “Abstract Postcards from the Seashore” are images inspired by the seashore of the South of France. Her paintings invite the viewer to share a place and a moment in time from her life and her memory with the desire to evoke a response and summon the viewer to engage in a conversation with her art and with herself as the sender.

Jude Barton’s “Chasing Kandinsky” series draws on the principle of color and form as an outward expression of an inner content. In her exploration of non-objective forms she uses a spiritual vocabulary of which Kandinsky speaks in his treatise “Concerning the Spiritual in Art”.  

Jude Barton’s “Chasing Kandinsky” series draws on the principle of color and form as an outward expression of an inner content. In her exploration of non-objective forms she uses a spiritual vocabulary of which Kandinsky speaks in his treatise “Concerning the Spiritual in Art”.  

Susan Hazaleus creates work that is ephemeral, unexpected and particularly interactive. Her work employs a variety of media including traditional materials along with more contemporary objects processes and materials such as electronic, microcontrollers, video, light, sound and kinetic components with light and movement.

Susan Hazaleus creates work that is ephemeral, unexpected and particularly interactive. Her work employs a variety of media including traditional materials along with more contemporary objects processes and materials such as electronic, microcontrollers, video, light, sound and kinetic components with light and movement.

Jen Herling’s mythopoetic dreamscapes express universal themes of isolation, loss and grief balanced with innocence, hope and strength. With a flair for innocence juxtaposed with a dark twist, her decidedly feminine figures are enigmatic and emotionally provocative.

Jen Herling’s mythopoetic dreamscapes express universal themes of isolation, loss and grief balanced with innocence, hope and strength. With a flair for innocence juxtaposed with a dark twist, her decidedly feminine figures are enigmatic and emotionally provocative.

Austin Howlett’s work is driven by a desire to invite the viewer into an emotional connection of vulnerability. His figurative images illustrate a connection and unity with the world through emotion and the comfort of the nature which surrounds them.  He challenges the viewer to participate in an empathetic attitude with their own vulnerability.

Austin Howlett’s work is driven by a desire to invite the viewer into an emotional connection of vulnerability. His figurative images illustrate a connection and unity with the world through emotion and the comfort of the nature which surrounds them.  He challenges the viewer to participate in an empathetic attitude with their own vulnerability.

Jim Riggin’s ink work stems from a loose stream of consciousness that is driven by the process itself. The result of fine detail and intricate patterns evoke an alternate time and place. A closer look at the patterns and images within images delights the viewer with surprises and discovery.

Jim Riggin’s ink work stems from a loose stream of consciousness that is driven by the process itself. The result of fine detail and intricate patterns evoke an alternate time and place. A closer look at the patterns and images within images delights the viewer with surprises and discovery.